Category Archives: The Imaginarium

Meet Mynah Marie….Founder of StreetCats Records, Co-Creator of Wildly Creative, Dream-Maker

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Wildly Creative: Creativity is…

The power of someone’s imagination reflected in the physical World.

Wildly Creative:  What is your first memory of connecting with your creative self? 

My creative life started as a child when I first discovered the power of imagination. As young as 4-5 years-old, I used to create stories and imaginary treasure hunts and expeditions in my parents backyard, on which I would go on with my imaginary friends, characters that I would imagine inspired by my favorite movie or book. My mom taught me to read very young, I was already reading novels at 5, and I think that this had a decisive effect on my childhood.

Naty photo - Mynah
The imaginary haven of a good book that had so much for me to dream about was one of my favorite things as a child. It’s funny because, even though at the time I was already playing music (started violin at 3, piano at 5), music didn’t trigger my creative side right away. I thinks it’s because the action of music was so associated with a system, something I needed to learn and work hard on. I remember having fun creating melodies on the piano at around 6-7 years old but that was before I got into serious classical music studies with that instrument. The real creativity flowing easily through music only happened much later for me, after I was able to free myself from all the restraints, conventions and preconceived ideas that the classical education system had so strongly implemented in my brain.

Wildly Creative:  What is your advice that you would offer to anyone wishing to design their own creative life?

Anything is possible. Be daring and brave. You can be everything you want to be. The power of imagination is to give birth to dreams and visions that belong only to you while creativity is the power to put these visions into the physical World.  Creativity can only go as far as your dreams can go. So dream wild, dream big, without any constraints, and then put your attention back into the physical World to start manifesting your visions into reality, step by step. The arrival point of that journey is not very important ; maybe you will manifest the vision exactly the way you dreamt it, maybe not. But one thing is sure, the journey will take you somewhere.  And if you hold your dream clearly in your mind and keep your intentions well connected in the heart, you will be safe and the ride will be amazing.

Wildly Creative:  What drives you wild with inspiration and passion? What is whispering to you that inspires you to create?

Human behavior. How we can so easily hurt each other only because we misunderstand other people’s reality. It fascinates me and also makes me sad. It makes me want to speak up. Having traveled so much and un-rooted myself to integrate another culture so many times, it gives me a different perspective on human behaviors, I see more clearly preconceived judgments implemented by social, cultural and religious filters. It hurts to see human beings, all similar by nature, tearing each other apart, most of the time because of simple ignorance. It makes me want to point it out, dig in the matters that are dividing us most, even if its not pretty. I love the feeling of diving deep into human nature to find that essence that unites us all, even if that means going through muddy waters of dark feelings and pain. I think that creating for me is a way to transcend that pain, make it useful, have it serve a purpose in this life instead of growing closed and bitter.

Some say I like darkness. I wouldn’t describe it as “liking” it, it’s more like I accept it, and this acceptance comes from the desire I have to grow beyond it. And I don’t believe in avoiding. I don’t think you can transcend something you don’t know or don’t understand. So I accept it when it comes in myself or others and that allows me to contemplate it, analyze it and maybe understand a bit more of the World we live in and my place in it… I think thats the place from which I create the most.

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Wildly Creative:  Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits. How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

It’s like the famous scene in The Matrix: “There is no spoon.”  I believe in good/pure intentions in the heart, a strong, well disciplined mind mixed with a wild imagination. If that’s there, whatever rule is in the way can go to hell.

In 2014, Mynah created the independent label StreetCats Records Inc. in Canada and now more recently in India. SCR aims to facilitate international expansion for quality underground artists from around the Globe.  Mynah is also the co-founder of Wildly Creative.World.  Read more about Mynah Marie here.

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Eila Carrico…Weaver, Wordsmith , and Wildly Creative Contributor

unnamedEila Carrico is a weaver and wordsmith who delights in the mystery and magic of landscapes and memory.  Check out more of her work at:   http://www.eilacarrico.com The italicized quotes within this piece are from Eila’s upcoming book, The Other Side of the River debuting in 2016.

Wildly Creative: Creativity is…..

Creativity is sporadic. She is impossible to contain, capture or cage. She calls in the middle of the night when you’d rather be sleeping and asks you to take up your pen, turn on the light, and write. You may complain that she doesn’t stop for weeks at a time, but when she deserts you for what seems like months on end you would give anything to have her back.

Creativity waits behind deadlines and routines. She may be shy around new friends and bold in the company of the heart. Certain people draw her out of you and others stifle her. She is particular about the arrangement of furniture in your living room, office and bedroom where you write. She delays you when you need to update the tools of your trade. She is a constant companion waiting to be acknowledged. She is a friend, your relationship with her is a unique universe that follows its own wild rules of engagement.

Creativity is you. Take care of her, and she will see that your life is never dull.

Wildly Creative: What is your first memory of connecting with your creative self?

I was probably six or seven, and my grandmother was making a painting of the ocean near her house. It was sunrise, and her canvas was full of soft pinks, gentle purple and blue with one tall grey heron standing on the edge of the scene.

I loved and admired her in that moment. Her hair was long and she was barefoot. I decided then I wanted to be an artist, and I already knew I preferred words and pens to paints and brushes. I also decided in that moment that I wanted to work in a place where I did not have to wear shoes. As a writer and yoga instructor, both job requirements have worked out for me so far.

Creativity-isWildly Creative: What is the advice you wish someone shared with you about pursuing your passions and feeding your creative self?

Own your title as artist, writer, poet, dancer, or actor as a verb. You are a writer when you write. A dancer when you dance, and an artist when you create. DO your art, and let it be the anvil that helps you to carve out your character and defines you. Don’t wait until you’ve published a book, performed on Broadway or sold a painting. Value your process.

These words are inspired by the choreographer Alonzo King, whom I saw during my first semester once I finally decided to allow myself to commit to my writing and invest in an MFA program. He also said you create because you have no choice. A desert rose blooms because it must, and does not care whether anyone is there to see it.

Wildly Creative: What drives you wild with inspiration and passion? What is whispering to you that inspires you to create?

The deep green of the forest, and the soft tickle of deer moss. The surging river, the quiet creek. Rainstorms, cicadas, crickets. I am recharged in nature, and I learn so much there. I wake up, I plug in, and I feel ready to be a part of creation. I am filled with new ideas, countless beyond the stars, and I feel there is plenty of time for each of them. Wild, untouched nature re-sets me and reminds me that the world around me is a work of art. And I am a participant.

I also love paradox, sharp photographs, playful paintings and good stories. The work of other artists inspires me to create as part of a conversation.

Wildly Creative: What keeps you wild and daring to create?

I am dedicated to truth and fascinated by mysteries. I write to explore and to understand a world full of meaning and messages. I write to surprise myself. I feel most alive when I write regularly, and I feel it in my bones and muscles when words are not flowing.

I need to move things through me or I get stuck. That’s what keeps me creating. Then truth is my editor. I always ask myself at the end of a piece I write or work I create: is this true? If it is, I’ll share it. If not, I start over.

 

 

Meet Suzanne Kingsbury….Part Creativity Coach, part Author Maximizer, Craft Master, & More…

headshotAs the founder and director of Gateless Writing, Inc, I am part creativity coach, part author maximizer, part writing therapist, craft master and brand builder.

This incredibly fulfilling work started when my first novel came out 15 years ago. The Summer Fletcher Greel Loved Me sold in ten days for six figures to Scribner, it was optioned for film and sold widely abroad. With this sale, I was invited into a sort of “closed door club” otherwise called the Publishing Industry. Because I am not much for the closed door, after my second book sold, I decided to open the door to help new (and seasoned) writers answer the call to write and begin that fantastic journey toward making the written word part of their career trajectory.

I now run writing salons, lead retreats, offer career training for writers and work one-on-one with writers to show them what a wildly wonderful road writing can actually be.
Check out Suzanne at: http://suzannekingsbury.net/

Wildly Creative: When did you start nurturing your creative life and why?

Isn’t it funny how we keep creativity in the closet? It’s like a puppy someone gave us that we aren’t supposed to keep, but we feed it and pet it when we can and then one day, it gets too big for us to hide, and we let it out of the closet to love up the world.

This is what happened to me. I’d maybe call mine a friendly but fiery dragon. I started writing the summer before I went on my Fulbright, in a heat wave, at a writing workshop for women on a college campus in upstate New York.

The place was six hours away, and I didn’t know a soul. The conference gave you time to write in the morning and in the afternoon, you were to go to workshops so you could talk about the work. I don’t know why I went to this conference. No one famous was there. I’d stopped writing in high school, kept the dragon in the closet so I could pursue more viable careers. But I still remember that first morning, I had only ever written in my journal in tiny (often lonely) increments, and now here was a whole morning to create lives out of a blank page.  During those four hours time ceased existing. The words seemed to arrive out of the ether, as though passed down in swaths and ribbons that had been waiting for me all along. The world I had created felt more vibrant and real than the one where I’d been living day to day.

Afterwards, I felt almost post-coital. Everything around me looked incredibly vibrant. I was sure the breeze in the trees was explicitly there so that the leaves could wave to me. It was a drug, and I haven’t stopped writing since. It took me seven years from that morning until I published my first book. That might be because I didn’t care about publishing, I was in mad love with the blank page, and anytime I got to dance with it was pure bliss.

Wildly Creative: What is your advice that you would offer to anyone wishing to design their own creative life?

If spirit or the divinity of creativity has tapped you with its magic wand, know that doors will swing open if you answer its call. The call is playful, the doors may look different than what our small minds can envision, walk through them anyway. Be curious about what may be waiting on the other side.

165465_10152738236860374_1268890022_nIn order to know where to put your energy as you embark on your creative life, choose a goal that makes you feel good, that makes you feel both light and excited. This often starts with smaller goals. For me, I started with wanting to write fiction. But then I found this too limiting. So, I decided my goal was to share the ecstasy of the written word and help others make a living from it. But what if, I keep asking myself, my goal is simply to spread light? To show others the almost blinding brightness of their truest selves. That’s my definition of my creative life. Yours might be to portray the truth as you see it, it might be to paint on bigger and bigger canvases (whatever your definition of canvas tends to be), it could be to expose something about gender, race, whatever…. That goal will keep you company. Let it be as malleable as you like.

And know that this path never has to be mutually exclusive of surviving or even thriving. Our world has ordered it so that it seems creativity comes with scarcity, living off cans of chickpeas and homemade beer in a warehouse in the bad section of town so you can create. This is an egoic, small mind idea. The small mind doesn’t want us to change, it is always looking for stasis, so it will say all kinds of things to get you to stop expanding.

Lose the idea that we have to be poor. Creative minds are at the core of everything we value in this world from the invention of the wheel to the road that takes you home at night, these ideas were all born from the creative muscle. There’s no reason to starve yourself in order to exercise this creative muscle. There’s no shame in making money while you create. I love to show my writers ways in which their ideas for books and other writing can be monetized, how they can make enterprises of their creative ideas, and to ensure them that their material dreams can come true alongside their creative ones.

The sweetness of a creative life is not about just manifestation, living off canned chickpeas and some homemade wine.

Wildly Creative: Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits. How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

Breaking rules is very important now in the field of writing. We have somehow imprisoned writing between walls of ivy. For whatever reason we believe that criticism is the primary tool to help writers with their work. This couldn’t be further from the truth. We approach the work as though it needed to be fixed, we look for what’s “wrong” with it. This is actually a broken model.

We know it is broken because cutting edge brain science has shown us that creative work thrives when it is nurtured. When our work is judged, the amygdala in the brain begins to move in reverse. When the amygdala moves in reverse, we are in fight or flight mode, we no longer have access to the imagination or long term memory, which is the core of creative work. And yet criticism is a mainstay to most programs.

In Gateless Writing, on retreat, in one-on-ones and classes, our biggest work is to get the amygdala moving forward. We can only create mind-blowing writing by showing the writers where she is unique, her talent and innate genius. She can then build from there. When you focus on what is strong, that is what naturally grows. For those pieces that feel like they need a little boost, we give the writer craft tools so she can always feel empowered on the page, no matter what she is working on.

A “thick skin” is something which is often coveted. But what we have found is that the thick skin is the worst kind for a writer. We want the thin skin because we want to be able to feel everything right down to the marrow, to write from that depth of feeling. In retreat, we area always letting the writer get to know again the person she was before the thick skin. We provide her with bodywork, chocolate, reflective feedback, craft tools, so that she can remember again the creative mastermind who lives inside.

Wildly Creative: What is the advice you wish someone shared with you about pursuing your passions and feeding your creative self?

Along the road there are so many shoulds, aren’t there? The advice is well-meaning, but often in its core it says this: You are not okay as you are, you must move away from the innate passion that claims you and forest your way into other, less organic, realms.

Theres-no-reason-toThis is simply a legacy we pass down to one another. I am not sure where it started, but perhaps it is part of the artist’s trajectory: to be steered away from what makes our true selves sing, to abandon it for conformity and conditioning, and then to have that time of unimaginable lightness of being when we discover it again. The rediscovery can give the creative an enormous amount of energy.

In truth we enter the world aligned with our heart’s purpose. If you look back at a life, you will often find a person’s purpose tucked into the activities s/he loved as a child.

For me? I loved to play pretend, which is so very much what we are doing when we write fiction. I made up fantastical stories and gave personalities to grasshoppers, hermit crabs, dandelions, believing each one embodied a spirit that I could somehow know and befriend. I also loved sitting by the heater and reading.

What if someone (who might have looked like Tasha Tudor) had come along and told me that my greatest gift would stem from this fantasy life? What if this gentle guide had assured me of how brilliant it was to dive into books the way I loved to, how smart to keep myself warm all day? What if an adult had been risky enough to say: Do exactly what you love, that is how genius blooms.

 

Meet Isabel Abbott…Writer, Activist, Speaker

 IsabelI am a writer and activist and speaker. A baker of pies and lover of learning. A feminist and a freedom seeker. An artist of salt water and maps, adaptation and liberation. I work with those crossing thresholds: sex and unlocked voices, birth and death, artists and seekers coming home to the body and holy human.  I am co-creator of In Her Skin and the founder of Writing Freedom Society.
I write for print publications and online and will be writing and studying as a presidential scholar fellowship recipient at Chicago Theological Seminary this year, exploring intersections of embodiment and ethics, gender and presence and cartography of faith.  Check out Isabel at: www.isabelabbott.com & www.listsandletters.com

Wildly Creative: Creativity is . . .

Isabel:  Both a way of being and of doing to me. It is life force, and the human movement toward creation, collecting and gathering from the shards and pieces, the moments and hints of illumination, and placing them together in a way that makes new sense, makes meaning, sometimes makes beauty, makes conversation and connection. It is about connection. And creativity is also about ways of seeing, the capacity and choice to look at a thing in a different way, or from a different angle and perspective, and imagine what before that moment had never existed in exactly that constellation. It is also pure joy. The surrender to the fire and the grief of the ashes and the joy in our own evolution.

Wildly Creative:  What is your advice that you would offer to anyone wishing to design their own creative life?

Isabel: Don’t think so hard, or try so hard. Creativity, a creative life, is not about doing this thing over here, or that over there. It is not a diagram or a chart or a path with neatly defined steps. And so maybe we don’t have to give so much effort to working at having a creative life, and we could just be here fully alive in the ins and outs of things. So I suppose I would say, make a royal effing mess, and then let it burn, and go make another one. Be open to not knowing, to the unknown, to the liminal and the cracks of light that pierce through and how after that the room you always knew familiar, even in the dark, is now a mystery to you. Remain ruthlessly devoted to your own curiosity and compulsions, those threads that tug at you and stitch through all the pieces of your days and life and all these years later you are still wide awake at night, wondering the mechanics of a tractor or the texture of silk or why the women in the statues you saw as a child never had heads. Invite them in and follow where they lead. And then go do as you do, be as you be, and to hell with everything else.

Wildly Creative:  What is the advice you wish someone shared with you about pursuing your passions and feeding your creative self?

Isabel:  Though I’m not sure I would have listened (I don’t like being told what to do), I would say that I wish someone had pressed upon me the importance of having a room and money and body and life of my own. These things did not happen for me until later in my life, and they changed everything, and I would not go back to the other way again. I think for me it is about freedom. To pursue my passions and feed my own creative self is to have the freedom to truly follow where that leads, as opposed to what will be most “marketable” or what someone else thinks I should be creating or doing or birthing. Making my own money, feeding myself in every sense of the word, has allowed me the gift of knowing my creativity and my creations arise from my own Source, and my own heartbeats and my own vocation. I pay for my own space and I have my own space, and it is here where I can write and create and be alone, and for me, this is vital. I suppose the simplest way to say it is, I wish someone had told me that all these things are mine, belonging to me. Because to know this and live this, is to have the agency to be fully alive in my own creative expression.

Wildly Creative: Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits. How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

Isabel:  Usually it feels more like choosing to just go within and do things my own way rather than follow the program or steps given, and in the process, this often means I’m breaking “rules” and walking on the outskirts or fringe, not fully fitting in with the stronger current of how things are done. I attend to this by choosing to step away for periods of time. To not read or take in any information “out there” so that I might be able to more clearly hear my own voice. When there are so many voices, so much noise, it can be hard to distinguish what is a voice and what is an echo. And I want to know and have a voice. For me this means being in the quiet sometimes. And from this place, when I do return to the wider world, whether I’m following rules or breaking them, it is still my choice, arising and originating in my own self, which is crucial to the integrity of my creative visions.

Meet Carline Gumbs…Accessory Artist & More!

Carline GumbsCarline Gumbs is a personal development facilitator, life skills coach, accessory artist and cool idea generator.   See more of Carline here: http://www.facebook.com/tiziktizik

Wildly Creative:  When did you start nurturing your creative life and why?

Carline:  I started nurturing my creative life from a young age (as far back as I can remember) by drawing, coloring, painting, taking things apart to put them together in a new way, being crafty. I did this partly because I think the gift is passed down in the genes-my mother is very creative; my dad is the math/science/fact guy but I didn’t get those genes from him, unfortunately.  My mother did a lot when we were younger to encourage and nurture that in me (and my sister).

Wildly Creative:  How do you define living a creative life? How important is that for you?

Carline: Living a creative life is liberating for me, not just in terms of expression but in terms of breaking all boundaries, categories, limitations. You are beyond definition, words, colour, shape. It is boundless and infinite. For me, it is also takes me to a spiritual space because I believe that when you create, what you create Is and there should be no judgment in that – It simply is the beautiful or not-so-beautiful thing that It Is (acceptance) and if you are not pleased with what you have done, you always have the idea to create a closer, better Idea or let it go (forgiveness).

Carline Gumbs Wildly Creative: What is the advice you wish someone shared with you about pursuing your passions and feeding your creative self?

Carline: Sometimes, often at the worst possible time, you will experience a wall (not unlike the Great Wall of China), a block (in your mind), or a barrier (in your heart), that will frustrate you to no end. Sometimes even the most patience, surrender or acceptance can’t begin to help you break through it. Sometimes you just have to keep creating, even if you are not happy with what you have created because whatever you have created will serve a purpose for some occasion, some time or some person. Wish I not only knew this earlier but that I remember it when it is most important.

Wildly Creative:  Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits. How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

Carline:  What rules?…. To consider breaking the rules, you have to acknowledge that there are even rules in the first place. So don’t.

Wildly Creative:  Your favorite muse or inspiration is…

Carline: At this point in time, Nature and Sacred Geometry.

 

Meet Shoshanna Silverberg…Artist, Advocate, & Entrepreneur

Shoshanna Silverberg

Shoshanna is an artist, advocate and entrepreneur.  She attended Hampshire College (F’01) in Amherst, Massachusetts.  While there she combined her studies in political philosophy and dance.  Her “div iii” as it’s called at Hampshire, was an installation art/performance piece integrating theory from multiple disciplines.  She now holds a Master of Arts in Holistic Thinking from The Graduate Institute in Bethany, CT and will graduate in May ’15 with her J.D. from Elon University School of Law in Greensboro, North Carolina.

 

Wildly Creative:  When did you start nurturing your creative life and why?

Shoshanna:  What a great question.  The key word of course being “nurturing”…  I have always been very creative, so creative that teachers often didn’t know what to do with me growing up.  They always thought I was “off-topic” or too talkative or daydreaming.  In response to that, when I was a teenager, I would rebel.  Or shut down.  And in the process, repress everything I had to offer.  Everything that, if I could find an outlet for, might make me really successful – success here being defined as happy…

What changed for me was being done with high school and seeking out educational opportunities that were off the beaten path.  Attending nontraditional university, having all kinds of jobs, working and living in intentional communities (aka retreat centers), anything that expanded my horizons and allowed me to explore who I was I moved towards.

Having alternative pedagogy around me, or alternative models for how people live, was super important.  It gave me the opportunity to live and learn in environments where what I brought personality wise and intellectually – aspects of consciousness that (if there is such a thing as an ‘I’) I could own.  And then I felt safe sharing.  This was the key to opening up my creative channels, and understanding that living in a way that is committed to being open, to feeling safe enough to share what dwells within, is part of my value system.  It’s what enables me to be me, which is a creative endeavor all of its own.  Then the practice – the real creativity – became that.  Figuring out how to live my values, ‘stay true’ as they say, every day.  But for me it started with feeling safe enough to share who I was and maybe even having to work a little bit in order to find that safety…  That has been my process of growing down, as the psychologist James Hillman puts it, as well as growing up!!

Wildly Creative:  What do you envision in regards to pursuing your creative passions?

Shoshanna:  I envision using my degrees – a bachelor’s, master’s and now J.D. —  in ways that people have never even thought of before.  I envision taking a creative approach to the study and practice of law so that all of the internal stuff that artists rely on to see their work through can be applied to a career in the field of law.

This may sound a little vague but that’s because it’s an organic process.  That’s not what the career services folks at my school want to hear and it’s certainly not what is drilled into us from an early age, but it’s what I’ve found makes sense whether I’m employed full-time as a yoga teacher (as I have been) or as a lobbyist (which I have also been).  And it’s how I’m moving forward in my life right now, at age 32.  There simply can’t be an arc of development that fits everyone equally.  We are all our own animals and if we forget that, our passions tend to languish.  So my advice is to allow for some organic flow – it’s the only way I’ve found to really keep the fountain of creativity bubbling and, at the same time, stay focused on my goals.

Wildly Creative:  What is the advice you wish someone shared with you about pursuing your passions and feeding your creative self?

I think it goes back to nurturing your creativity, which is really nurturing the aspects of consciousness that make you YOU.  For me this means being aware of my body from an holistic perspective.  This means “listening” to my body, being aware of my breath, noticing changes in my moods and honoring wherever it is that my feelings are coming from.  That requires setting out time and space for practicing mindfulness – for practicing yoga or meditating, rubbing my feet and being really quiet, giving attention to what I put into my body, and being really kind to the various “parts” that make up my whole.

Above all else, or in service to all of that, is finding a sense of kindness and compassion for myself.  Checking in to make sure that I’m giving as much respect and care to myself as I tend to give others.  I’m not saying I’m extremely successful at this all of the time, but being aware that this is what I need to do has really helped.  It’s boosted my creativity over the years like crazy.

 

Wildly Creative: Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits.  How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

Shoshanna:  Well, as a final semester law school student, I can say that ‘rules’ occupy a painfully strong presence in my life.  But, we sign up for things, yes?  I chose law school, however unconventional my “legal” career will be.  And so I have to adapt to where I’m at, which means fitting into boxes and finding love and appreciation for rules…

Although I guess the truthful answer to this question is that I still break rules because it’s hard for me not to. I don’t even understand rules as others do.  I always see larger contexts for things that make holding fast to history and tradition a tough pill to swallow.  I always tend to have questions in my mind that buck whatever assumptions underlie a given rule.  So in that way it’s inevitable that I will ‘break’ rules just by being me.  At the least, I question rules and am very vocal about that, which is part of being me.

What I have learned though is that sometimes what feels like a straightjacket can teach you how to move in all kinds of creative ways.  It’s like a Merce Cunningham performance piece, for all you modern dancers out there.  You have a structure, maybe a whole choreographed piece has to happen on top of a tiny box and there are ten dancers who have to play a part on top of that one small box.  Or dancers’ ankles are bound together.  Or one is blindfolded.  There are challenges you have in life that feel like rules in the sense that they themselves cannot, or cannot easily, be changed.  So you have to adapt.  And in that adaptation, in which you are totally pushing the boundaries of a rule, you are breaking it.  But this happens as a result of you changing your relationship to a rule, not because the rule itself is actually changing.  And there is peace in that.  There is also power.  The destruction is actually re-construction.

When you live this way for awhile, you keep ‘breaking rules’ because that is in line with who you are.  But there’s a balance to be found in this paradigm, where the breaking actually allows you to live more fully.  And what’s more, your ‘rule-breaking’ actually empowers others to change their relationships to rules.  This is scary for many people – uh oh, anarchy! – but what that fear of changing relationships to rules is about is a fear of people being themselves.  They are afraid of who that is and of who everyone else is.  There is an assumption that we as humans can’t be trusted to really ‘be ourselves’ and/or define our relationship to rules.  Again, I challenge that assumption.  I believe creativity lights a path to another form of reasoning.

Because ultimately it’s like this – real creativity  — authenticity — is like love; its effects create more wholeness and less tearing down or apart.  And at the same time, it changes the way we live.  It allows us to reveal ourselves to one another.  And that’s its beauty.  That’s why it’s a gift.

Want to see more of Shoshanna?

Check out Shoshanna’s blog at http://holistictoolkit.com or find her on Twitter @holistictoolkit.  Especially if you’re down with the idea that the wellness of a community is related to the quality of and access to justice for everyone within a community.  If you’re just a fan of cutting edge takes on mindfulness and social change.  Or if you just love variety and appreciate yoga, meditation and conversations about creativity and authenticity.  And of course, if you’re a law student.

Wyatt Andrews

 

Wyatt Andrews

Wildly Creative: In your own words, what do you do Wyatt?

Wyatt: I play with things, I tinker. Music, food, crafts, like creating and building.

I just play with the world.

Wildly Creative: When did you start nurturing your creative life and why?

Wyatt: Always. I think all children are creative. It is something you have and do instinctually

Nurturing it is whether or not your have cool parents.

Wildly Creative: Fill in the blank, Creativity is…..

Wyatt: Seeing what is not there and making it so.

Wildly Creative: What is your first memory of connecting with your creative self?

Wyatt: I grew up in the middle of nowhere more or less by myself. When I was very young my best friends were the ghosts in the house and they were my playmates. To engage with them, I had to engage the creative part of my mind, create who they were, and I was creating a whole world and the games for us (me and these ghosts) to engage.

Wyatt Andrews

 

Wildly Creative: What was your world like with these ghosts?

Wyatt: We talked about the difference between being a ghost and being a person.

I remember pretending I was the ghost and that I was back playing with legos at the house when I was on my way to pre-school. We spent a lot of time in my backyard of my house.

My house was built in the 1700s and I spent a lot of time in these very old spaces. Interacting with all of this history that was there.

Wildly Creative: What is your advice that you would offer to anyone wishing to design their own creative life?

Wyatt: The turning point for me was realizing that you don’t have to be a great artist to be really creative. You can find ways to be creative in whatever you do. It is cliché but I stopped creating art or be creative for other people. I did it for my own enjoyment. When I started creating for myself it is when I have felt the most joy with it. I did not tell myself “no I can’t do that” nor did I tell myself “I am not good enough.” I just did it regardless of how much I sucked.

I just sucked at things and did not care and I did because it was fun and I wanted to do it.

Wildly Creative: Creatives are usually the ones breaking the rules and little bits of misfits. How are you making sure to hold true to breaking the rules?

Wyatt: First I learn the rules because it only counts if you now them to begin with. I stick with the ones that are going to work and I leave the rest or I change them. In regards to rules, this sums it up best: you gave me this thing and I don’t like what you have given me, so I decided to do something else

If a rule is not going to serve you then it is not worth following and there is a difference between rules and limitations. Knowing your limitations is useful. I am also aware there are repercussions for breaking the rules and I am ready for those consequences at any given time. But you have to know when breaking the rules is worth the on consequences.”